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Pennine Way - National Trail Donations

Pennine Way - National Trail Donations




About the Pennine Way

Steeped in history and traversing spectacular landscapes, the iconic Pennine Way stretches for 268 miles (435km) across England’s wild northern uplands. The route follows Britain’s rocky spine from the hills of the Derbyshire Peak District and the Yorkshire Dales, through the stunning Swaledale Valley, across the North Pennines and over Hadrian’s Wall in Northumberland to the Cheviot Hills, ending in the Scottish Borders in Kirk Yetholm.

The Pennine Way was the first National Trail in England and is one of the UK’s most famous long-distance walks. Opened on 24th April 1965, it paved the way for public access to some of England’s wildest landscapes.

What is special about the Trail?

To many people, the Pennine Way is much more than a walk; it is part of the history of access to the hills in England and walking the Trail makes you part of that story. The Trail passes through some of England’s best landscapes and wildlife areas including three National Parks and various National Nature Reserves. The variety of habitats make it one of the best places in Europe to see birds like breeding waders in the spring and early summer.

Walking the Pennine Way is a tour of spectacular natural landmarks and historic sites. At the start of the Trail in Edale you’ll walk up Kinder Scout, site of the 1932 Mass Trespass, which became a key moment in the struggle for public access to private land in the UK. Alongside some of England’s best landscape and wildlife areas, other highlights along the route include Stoodley Pike, Top Withins, Malham Cove, Pen-y-ghent, Tan Hill, High Force, Cauldron Snout, High Cup Nick, Cross Fell, Hadrian’s Wall and The Cheviot.



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